Black History Month and The Misconception of Its Importance

The+HHS+Library%27s+display+reminds+students+why+we+celebrate+Black+History+Month.+
Back to Article
Back to Article

Black History Month and The Misconception of Its Importance

The HHS Library's display reminds students why we celebrate Black History Month.

The HHS Library's display reminds students why we celebrate Black History Month.

Ashanti Johnson

The HHS Library's display reminds students why we celebrate Black History Month.

Ashanti Johnson

Ashanti Johnson

The HHS Library's display reminds students why we celebrate Black History Month.

Ashanti Johnson, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Though February is the month of love, Valentine’s Day, and all things chocolate, it is often forgotten that it is a very special time, honoring how far we as African Americans have come as a culture.

Being black has come with a price. Slavery, discrimination, segregation, police brutality, and bullying are just some of the things that we have struggled with throughout the years.

Yet those hardships and trials birthed some of the greatest influencers that America has ever seen. Influencers and civil rights activists like Rosa Parks, Sojourner Truth, Malcolm X, W.E.B. DuBois, and so many others have shaped our culture in ways we may never be able to repay.

However, civil rights activists weren’t the only people that arose during these hardships — poets, authors, Nobel Peace Prize winners, athletes, inventors, scientists, and great men and women came from these hard times.

It is so important to understand the vitality of black history, not only because it is touched on in history classes, but because it truly helps you understand the culture of the people around you and it helps you appreciate the price that was paid for their freedom as well as your own.

Martin Luther King Jr. was a catalyst for this freedom that has taken place in us. He was the ringleader for many Civil Rights Movements and he believed that one day, we would come together as brothers and sisters, seeing no color, believing only in love.

“I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality.. I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word,” he said.

If it wasn’t for Martin Luther King Jr. and his dream that segregation would end in all areas, I wouldn’t be writing this paper, going to this school, and I wouldn’t be able to speak out about the things I believe in; therefore, I am proud to be black. I am proud of the sacrifices men and women braver than I have made to make me as free as I am. It is said that freedom is never given; it is won. I believe that we have won.

Victory is ours and we are free. Bondage is now a thing of the past.

So here’s to sacrifice, progress, melanin, and the beautiful legacy of a love that sees no color. ”

— Ashanti Johnson

So here’s to sacrifice, progress, melanin, and the beautiful legacy of a love that sees no color. This month, I choose to celebrate black history in hopes that one day, I will have a little black history of my own and that my name will be written among the greats who laid the foundation for the things I have now.

We have come a long way in our society and we still have a long way to go; however, I am extremely thankful that we aren’t where we used to be. 

I am black… and I am proud of it.